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Thread: Why so long on the market?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    Default Why so long on the market?

    I guess being new to the site, and only spending a couple years looking at coaches...

    I'm confused.

    Why is it that some of these coaches aren't selling? I get it. There's only so much demand out there.

    Is it financing? from what I understand, 20 years old is the magic number. Trip over that, and it's a cash deal. Correct?

    Are these 125k coaches over priced? The owners just don't want to admit there isn't a buyer, and won't drop their price? Many of the coaches seem to not be 'in use' and just sit. SO instead of admitting they priced it too high, they just let it sit, instead of dropping the price to move it.

    Are people just always 'fishing'? and having their coach up for sale, with no real intent to move it?
    In other words.. IF someone came along and paid me 150 for my coach.. I'd go get that XXX one I covet for 250.

    I'm just trying to understand the dynamics.

    I've only seen one coach in person.. despite watching ads for a few years. I have plans to go look at a few at a dealer or two in FL in Nov. Trying to nail down what converter I'd prefer, and what floor plan.

    Then it's going to come down to finding a surveyor (is that what they are called?) to help me shop. I realize I'm mechanically inclined, but there's so much specialty knowledge that could save you a big mistake. I'm still a couple years away, and planning to buy with cash. No rush.. trying to find the right 'fit' for the right person to help me find the right coach. I've found that the person is way more important in the equation. Find the knowledge and experience, and be willing to pay for it.

    JP

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Beverly Hills
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    Default

    Given you put $125K out there, I'm guessing you are talking about early to mid 90s XL models.

    More buyers are looking for slide coaches powered by series 60 engines. These factors make pre 95 coaches a longer sale.


    Gil and Durlene
    2003 H-3 Hoffman Conversion

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    SIOUX FALLS
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gil_J View Post
    Given you put $125K out there, I'm guessing you are talking about early to mid 90s XL models.

    More buyers are looking for slide coaches powered by series 60 engines. These factors make pre 95 coaches a longer sale.
    So.. you're just telling me I'm weird, wanting a non slide coach. I'm looking at the late 90s, early 2000s non slide coaches. I just think it will work (for me)

    I could totally be wrong. I need to spend some time with my bride (no dogs in a rental) and see how we like the lifestyle.

    JP

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Chicago
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    Default

    Comparitivly I think mid to late 90s nonslide coaches r the best chassis for their asking prices, that r out there.

    The market does not realize the value of used prevo, never did. Their systems r quite complete and redundant while way less complicated compared to newer stuff and they also have the engines with the most power and fuel mialage.

    I'm not weird just a bit odd but on this topic we r defiantly not alone.

    My opinion is when these type buses linger on the market all too often, possibly, maybe many bought them for way too much and don't want to take a beating while at the same time many buyers r chizlers and low ballers with asking prices that r already very reasonable. Then pile on that financing Factor you're already aware of and it becomes difficult to sell these things. How about the fact that most sellers don't need the money that is maybe some factor. Many owners have strong attachments. Lots of memories. Lots of Lewbucks.( the total sum of all maintenance over the entire period of ownership)

    The mid to late 90s slide or non slide r 9/10 the bus for less than 1/10 the price of new.

    If u find a mid to late 90s bus for 125 or even 150 that's well cared for and documented don't make the mistake of a pitiful first offer thats a lot of camper for the money.

    On a side note when u do find your mid to late 90s bus, at what ever price, be prepared to maintain a million dollar vehicle.

    Good luck and welcome to POG

    Have u ever looked at Kingsley? Just kidding

    Also from a mechanics point of view the XLII dashes r way more accessible and easier to work on but the dashes in the XLV r mobetta, solid, and the entire look of the cockpit looking down from the driver's seat is quite different.

    There's a rally going on right now and there's always way less activity on the website when there is so don't be disappointed by the lack of response on this thread it'll come
    Last edited by Joe Camper; 09-25-2018 at 08:07 AM.
    1990 Peterbuilt 377
    3406 B Caterpillar
    9 Speed Roadranger
    708 243 7871

  5. #5
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    May 2012
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    Beverly Hills
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    Default

    You are certainly not wierd wanting a non slide coach. You are just part of a minority; not a bad minority. As such, you can be more selective. Don't let me suggest that some non slide coaches won't sell fast. The ones in better condition that have more aesthetic appeal that are priced right will still sell fast.

    FWIW, a late 90s XL is likely the most reliable product out there. Certainly, the XL chassis has more miles than any other chassis.

    $125K for a 99-00 is a competitive price, if well maintained and everything works. I owned a 99 XL CC conversion and loved it.


    Gil and Durlene
    2003 H-3 Hoffman Conversion

  6. #6
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    Sep 2018
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    SIOUX FALLS
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    Default

    Gil

    Thanks. That's sort of the direction I'm leaning. I haven't really narrowed down exactly what it is I'd like.

    BUT.. the idea of paying for good 'bones' with a floorplan I like is fine with me.

    Decisions like this are always trade offs. I'm ok with higher maintenance cost, as long as I'm doing it without financing.

    I have a snowcat to groom snowmobile trails. I told my friends in the club when I got it.... I'm ok with a 10 thousand dollar snowcat, as long as I can do it a few thousand dollars at a time. Similar thought here. I'm ok with buying good bones, with something I can live with. If properly maintained, I have to think these coaches are pretty reliable. Why not buy one for 150.. then sink another 150 in it to make it exactly what you want. The downside is.. it's for YOUR use. It's still going to be worth not near what you put into it.

    BUT.. like my house. I'm building it for me, not resale value. I'm ok with high maintenance/ upgrade bills. I know one of those two you get to choose the timing of.

    My job gets me to PBI often. Fingers crossed it works out for the gathering. That would give me a ton more knowledge.

    JP

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Crossville
    Posts
    16

    Default

    "On a side note when u do find your mid to late 90s bus, at what ever price, be prepared to maintain a million dollar vehicle."

    When we were active in restoring collectible ultra-luxury cars, we were told that the cars were very expensive to buy and maintain when new. As they got older they were cheaper to buy but remained expensive to maintain. We saw many owners that could afford to buy a collectible but were not in a position to maintain it. Over the years, the car would "decline" and a subsequent owner would be faced with catching up on the deferred maintenance. Catching up is a very expensive task.

    It has been said that $30k is not unreasonable to get a bus in a safe and usable condition. That means one might have the purchase price, taxes and $30k invested before getting in a position to make updates and changes.

    We were lucky to buy a well maintained 2006 and had few "must do" items. We still made changes to suit our needs and replaced/updated many items to get it to what we like to joke is a "2018" conversion.

    We were looking for the right bus. It took several years. When we found it, we needed to have everything in order so that we could make it ours quickly. Being a cash in hand buyer makes the process much simpler and quicker.

    Happy Trails!
    Les Stallings
    Crossville TN
    2006 Country Coach XLII

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
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    SIOUX FALLS
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    Default

    Thanks

    That is the position I'm headed towards. I'm aiming to have the coach money in cash.. and 50k in repair, sales tax, register money. I would hope there's a bit of 'emergency break down' money left over of the 50.

    Any comment on what the budget would be to (is commission the word?) or enlist? someone's help in evaluating a coach? I would imagine that only a small portion of the work could be done remotely.. an experienced person could likely ascertain SOME of a coach's condition via phone calls. But in the end.. you're gonna need to fly someone out to look at a coach on your behalf.. OR meet there there to look over things.

    JP

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